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The Dangers of Destructive Dog Chewing

J. Wesley Porter June 19, 2018

Effective tips to stop destructive dog chewing

A dog always chews. It’s in their nature. But sometimes it means that the dog is experiencing something uncomfortable, and it’s coping with it through chewing on food and things. The poor pooch might be going through a tough time; that’s why it is important to see to it that they are not munching toward destructive dog chewing.

 

Here are the common reasons why dogs chew:

  1. Stress. When its owners leave or when other dogs are having a good time outside, a dog tends to chew on anything that its teeth land on to cope with the stress of separation and frustration.
  2. Curiosity. As loyal as they are to their humans, dogs also love to explore the taste of worldly things. They chew on objects that smell, look, and taste like food.
  3. Boredom. They need some activities to focus their energy on, and chewing is a typical alternative to enough playtime.
  4. Lack of exercise. Lack of exercise is tantamount to neglecting a dog’s health; all that pent-up energy is one big reason for the dog to sit and chew all day.
  5. Teething. When puppies’ teeth start to grow or when their baby teeth are replaced with adult teeth, it’s painful and frustrating. The best way for them to cope with it is to chew on something to ease the pain of adulting.
  6. Hunger. Chewing can be a way to cope with hunger. Dogs hunt for food, and when they see none, they go search for a substitute to chew on.

 

It is normal to chew, even healthy. Chewing helps an adult dog strengthen and clean their teeth, and it also helps young ones to cope with growing teeth. The problem arises when the dog’s health and the precious things in the house are on the line. If this happens, destructive dog chewing should be addressed right away.

 

How to Stop Your Dog from Destructive Chewing:

  1. House proofing. Pooches like to chew everything that attracts them. Among their favorites are shoes, the feet of the table or chair, mats, and garbage. Before leaving the house, it is best to keep valuable things, hazardous items, and garbage away from their reach and smell.
  2. Clinically-approved dog toys. Give dogs safe toys to dig into. Depending on the way they chew, vets recommend the following toys for different dog “chews-onality.”

For Inhalers:

Rope chew toys

Rubber (firm) chew toys

Stuffed toys

Tennis balls

 

For Destroyers:

Edible chews and treats

Bully sticks

Rubber (firm) chew toys

Rawhides

 

For Nibblers:

Tennis balls

Stuffed toys

Edible chews and treats

Rubber chew toys

Bully sticks

Rawhides

Rope chew toys

 

  1. Exercise and playtime. To discourage destructive dog chewing and promote healthy lifestyle, dogs should exercise regularly with their owners, either by jogging, hiking, or playing sports. Owners can also think of ways to distract their dogs from chewing off their favorite shoes.
  2. Training. Owners should constantly train their dogs to chew nothing except the chew toys they are given. This minimizes the destruction of the things in the house and prevents the dog from choking or getting poisoned.
  3. Dog stress minimization. One way to stop destructive dog chewing is to reduce the stress of the pets. Stress is mainly due to problems in the dog’s health. To address this, owners should consult a vet for further observation.

 

To be safer, visit your local veterinarian regularly for more destructive chewing dog tips. It is also best to be on the lookout for the things that the dog is chewing on in cases of choking or poisoning.

 

It’s a good way to start learning how to keep your dog from chewing the house off. Find out more helpful topics about taking care of your furry best friends on www.loveaspiritualdogbear.com. To have more access to up-to-date blogs, follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads. Check out my book, A Spiritual Dog: “Bear to know how my dog, Bear, lives life with my family.

 

 

References:

 

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 2018. “Destructive Chewing.” Accessed on May 15, 2018. https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/dog-care/common-dog-behavior-issues/destructive-chewing.

 

Conn, Kristy, MD. 2017. “5 Steps to Correct Inappropriate Dog Chewing.” Cesar’s Way. Accessed on May 15, 2018. https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-behavior/destructive-chewing/5-steps-to-correct-inappropriate-dog-chewing.

 

Nicholas, Jason, MD. 2016. “3 Simple Steps to Choose the Best Chews for Your Dog.” Preventive Vet. Accessed on May 15, 2018. https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/choosing-safe-dog-chew-toys.

 

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